Microscopic Anatomy Of Testis And Ovary Pdf File


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microscopic anatomy of testis and ovary pdf file

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Structure of the Male Reproductive System

Unique for its role in human reproduction, a gamete is a specialized sex cell carrying 23 chromosomes—one half the number in body cells. At fertilization, the chromosomes in one male gamete, called a sperm or spermatozoon , combine with the chromosomes in one female gamete, called an oocyte.

The function of the male reproductive system Figure The paired testes are a crucial component in this process, as they produce both sperm and androgens, the hormones that support male reproductive physiology. In humans, the most important male androgen is testosterone. Several accessory organs and ducts aid the process of sperm maturation and transport the sperm and other seminal components to the penis, which delivers sperm to the female reproductive tract.

In this section, we examine each of these different structures, and discuss the process of sperm production and transport. The testes are located in a skin-covered, highly pigmented, muscular sack called the scrotum that extends from the body behind the penis see Figure The dartos muscle makes up the subcutaneous muscle layer of the scrotum Figure It continues internally to make up the scrotal septum, a wall that divides the scrotum into two compartments, each housing one testis.

Descending from the internal oblique muscle of the abdominal wall are the two cremaster muscles, which cover each testis like a muscular net. By contracting simultaneously, the dartos and cremaster muscles can elevate the testes in cold weather or water , moving the testes closer to the body and decreasing the surface area of the scrotum to retain heat.

Alternatively, as the environmental temperature increases, the scrotum relaxes, moving the testes farther from the body core and increasing scrotal surface area, which promotes heat loss.

Externally, the scrotum has a raised medial thickening on the surface called the raphae. They produce both sperm and androgens, such as testosterone, and are active throughout the reproductive lifespan of the male.

Paired ovals, the testes are each approximately 4 to 5 cm in length and are housed within the scrotum see Figure They are surrounded by two distinct layers of protective connective tissue Figure The outer tunica vaginalis is a serous membrane that has both a parietal and a thin visceral layer.

Beneath the tunica vaginalis is the tunica albuginea, a tough, white, dense connective tissue layer covering the testis itself. Not only does the tunica albuginea cover the outside of the testis, it also invaginates to form septa that divide the testis into to structures called lobules.

Within the lobules, sperm develop in structures called seminiferous tubules. During the seventh month of the developmental period of a male fetus, each testis moves through the abdominal musculature to descend into the scrotal cavity. The tightly coiled seminiferous tubules form the bulk of each testis. They are composed of developing sperm cells surrounding a lumen, the hollow center of the tubule, where formed sperm are released into the duct system of the testis.

Specifically, from the lumens of the seminiferous tubules, sperm move into the straight tubules or tubuli recti , and from there into a fine meshwork of tubules called the rete testes. Sperm leave the rete testes, and the testis itself, through the 15 to 20 efferent ductules that cross the tunica albuginea.

Inside the seminiferous tubules are six different cell types. These include supporting cells called sustentacular cells, as well as five types of developing sperm cells called germ cells. Germ cell development progresses from the basement membrane—at the perimeter of the tubule—toward the lumen.

Surrounding all stages of the developing sperm cells are elongate, branching Sertoli cells. Sertoli cells are a type of supporting cell called a sustentacular cell, or sustentocyte, that are typically found in epithelial tissue. Sertoli cells secrete signaling molecules that promote sperm production and can control whether germ cells live or die. They extend physically around the germ cells from the peripheral basement membrane of the seminiferous tubules to the lumen.

Tight junctions between these sustentacular cells create the blood—testis barrier , which keeps bloodborne substances from reaching the germ cells and, at the same time, keeps surface antigens on developing germ cells from escaping into the bloodstream and prompting an autoimmune response.

Spermatogonia are the stem cells of the testis, which means that they are still able to differentiate into a variety of different cell types throughout adulthood. Spermatogonia divide to produce primary and secondary spermatocytes, then spermatids, which finally produce formed sperm.

The process that begins with spermatogonia and concludes with the production of sperm is called spermatogenesis. As just noted, spermatogenesis occurs in the seminiferous tubules that form the bulk of each testis see Figure One production cycle, from spermatogonia through formed sperm, takes approximately 64 days.

A new cycle starts approximately every 16 days, although this timing is not synchronous across the seminiferous tubules. Sperm counts—the total number of sperm a man produces—slowly decline after age 35, and some studies suggest that smoking can lower sperm counts irrespective of age. The process of spermatogenesis begins with mitosis of the diploid spermatogonia Figure However, mature gametes are haploid 1 n , containing 23 chromosomes—meaning that daughter cells of spermatogonia must undergo a second cellular division through the process of meiosis.

Two identical diploid cells result from spermatogonia mitosis. One of these cells remains a spermatogonium, and the other becomes a primary spermatocyte , the next stage in the process of spermatogenesis. As in mitosis, DNA is replicated in a primary spermatocyte, before it undergoes a cell division called meiosis I. During meiosis I each of the 23 pairs of chromosomes separates. This results in two cells, called secondary spermatocytes, each with only half the number of chromosomes.

Now a second round of cell division meiosis II occurs in both of the secondary spermatocytes. During meiosis II each of the 23 replicated chromosomes divides, similar to what happens during mitosis.

Thus, meiosis results in separating the chromosome pairs. This second meiotic division results in a total of four cells with only half of the number of chromosomes. Each of these new cells is a spermatid.

Although haploid, early spermatids look very similar to cells in the earlier stages of spermatogenesis, with a round shape, central nucleus, and large amount of cytoplasm. A process called spermiogenesis transforms these early spermatids, reducing the cytoplasm, and beginning the formation of the parts of a true sperm. The fifth stage of germ cell formation—spermatozoa, or formed sperm—is the end result of this process, which occurs in the portion of the tubule nearest the lumen.

Eventually, the sperm are released into the lumen and are moved along a series of ducts in the testis toward a structure called the epididymis for the next step of sperm maturation. Sperm are smaller than most cells in the body; in fact, the volume of a sperm cell is 85, times less than that of the female gamete. Approximately to million sperm are produced each day, whereas women typically ovulate only one oocyte per month. As is true for most cells in the body, the structure of sperm cells speaks to their function.

Sperm have a distinctive head, mid-piece, and tail region Figure The head of the sperm contains the extremely compact haploid nucleus with very little cytoplasm. Tightly packed mitochondria fill the mid-piece of the sperm.

ATP produced by these mitochondria will power the flagellum, which extends from the neck and the mid-piece through the tail of the sperm, enabling it to move the entire sperm cell.

The central strand of the flagellum, the axial filament, is formed from one centriole inside the maturing sperm cell during the final stages of spermatogenesis. To fertilize an egg, sperm must be moved from the seminiferous tubules in the testes, through the epididymis, and—later during ejaculation—along the length of the penis and out into the female reproductive tract. Though the epididymis does not take up much room in its tightly coiled state, it would be approximately 6 m 20 feet long if straightened.

It takes an average of 12 days for sperm to move through the coils of the epididymis, with the shortest recorded transit time in humans being one day. Sperm enter the head of the epididymis and are moved along predominantly by the contraction of smooth muscles lining the epididymal tubes. As they are moved along the length of the epididymis, the sperm further mature and acquire the ability to move under their own power.

Once inside the female reproductive tract, they will use this ability to move independently toward the unfertilized egg. The more mature sperm are then stored in the tail of the epididymis the final section until ejaculation occurs. During ejaculation, sperm exit the tail of the epididymis and are pushed by smooth muscle contraction to the ductus deferens also called the vas deferens.

The ductus deferens is a thick, muscular tube that is bundled together inside the scrotum with connective tissue, blood vessels, and nerves into a structure called the spermatic cord see Figure Because the ductus deferens is physically accessible within the scrotum, surgical sterilization to interrupt sperm delivery can be performed by cutting and sealing a small section of the ductus vas deferens.

This procedure is called a vasectomy, and it is an effective form of male birth control. Although it may be possible to reverse a vasectomy, clinicians consider the procedure permanent, and advise men to undergo it only if they are certain they no longer wish to father children. Watch this video to learn about a vasectomy. As described in this video, a vasectomy is a procedure in which a small section of the ductus vas deferens is removed from the scrotum.

This interrupts the path taken by sperm through the ductus deferens. If sperm do not exit through the vas, either because the man has had a vasectomy or has not ejaculated, in what region of the testis do they remain? From each epididymis, each ductus deferens extends superiorly into the abdominal cavity through the inguinal canal in the abdominal wall.

Sperm make up only 5 percent of the final volume of semen , the thick, milky fluid that the male ejaculates. The bulk of semen is produced by three critical accessory glands of the male reproductive system: the seminal vesicles, the prostate, and the bulbourethral glands.

As sperm pass through the ampulla of the ductus deferens at ejaculation, they mix with fluid from the associated seminal vesicle see Figure The paired seminal vesicles are glands that contribute approximately 60 percent of the semen volume. Seminal vesicle fluid contains large amounts of fructose, which is used by the sperm mitochondria to generate ATP to allow movement through the female reproductive tract.

The fluid, now containing both sperm and seminal vesicle secretions, next moves into the associated ejaculatory duct , a short structure formed from the ampulla of the ductus deferens and the duct of the seminal vesicle.

The paired ejaculatory ducts transport the seminal fluid into the next structure, the prostate gland. As shown in Figure About the size of a walnut, the prostate is formed of both muscular and glandular tissues.

It excretes an alkaline, milky fluid to the passing seminal fluid—now called semen—that is critical to first coagulate and then decoagulate the semen following ejaculation. The temporary thickening of semen helps retain it within the female reproductive tract, providing time for sperm to utilize the fructose provided by seminal vesicle secretions. When the semen regains its fluid state, sperm can then pass farther into the female reproductive tract. The prostate normally doubles in size during puberty.

At approximately age 25, it gradually begins to enlarge again. This enlargement does not usually cause problems; however, abnormal growth of the prostate, or benign prostatic hyperplasia BPH , can cause constriction of the urethra as it passes through the middle of the prostate gland, leading to a number of lower urinary tract symptoms, such as a frequent and intense urge to urinate, a weak stream, and a sensation that the bladder has not emptied completely.

By age 60, approximately 40 percent of men have some degree of BPH. By age 80, the number of affected individuals has jumped to as many as 80 percent.

Structure of the Male Reproductive System

Metrics details. Stem cells in the ovary comprise of two distinct populations including very small embryonic-like stem cells VSELs and slightly bigger progenitors termed ovarian stem cells OSCs. They are lodged in ovary surface epithelium OSE and are expected to undergo neo-oogenesis and primordial follicle PF assembly in adult ovaries. Present study was undertaken to further characterize adult sheep OSCs and to understand their role during neo-oogenesis and PF assembly. Effect of FSH on stem cells was also studied in vitro. GCN and cohort of PF were observed in the ovarian cortex and provided evidence in support of neo-oogenesis from the stem cells. Results of present study provide further evidence in support of two stem cells populations in adult sheep ovary.

The male reproductive system includes the penis, scrotum, testes, epididymis, vas deferens, prostate, and seminal vesicles. The penis and the urethra are part of the urinary and reproductive systems. The scrotum, testes testicles , epididymis, vas deferens, seminal vesicles, and prostate comprise the rest of the reproductive system. The penis consists of the root which is attached to the lower abdominal structures and pelvic bones , the visible part of the shaft, and the glans penis the cone-shaped end. The opening of the urethra the channel that transports semen and urine is located at the tip of the glans penis. The base of the glans penis is called the corona. In uncircumcised males, the foreskin prepuce extends from the corona to cover the glans penis.

Histological and transcriptomic effects of 17α-methyltestosterone on zebrafish gonad development

Unique for its role in human reproduction, a gamete is a specialized sex cell carrying 23 chromosomes—one half the number in body cells. At fertilization, the chromosomes in one male gamete, called a sperm or spermatozoon , combine with the chromosomes in one female gamete, called an oocyte. The function of the male reproductive system Figure The paired testes are a crucial component in this process, as they produce both sperm and androgens, the hormones that support male reproductive physiology. In humans, the most important male androgen is testosterone.

Metrics details. Sex hormones play important roles in teleost ovarian and testicular development. In zebrafish, ovarian differentiation appears to be dictated by an oocyte-derived signal via Cyp19a1a aromatase-mediated estrogen production. Androgens and aromatase inhibitors can induce female-to-male sex reversal, however, the mechanisms underlying gonadal masculinisation are poorly understood. MT treatment upregulated expression of genes involved in male sex determination and differentiation amh , dmrt1 , gsdf and wt1a and those involved in oxygenated androgen production cyp11c1 and hsd11b2.

Testis , plural testes, also called testicle , in animals, the organ that produces sperm , the male reproductive cell , and androgens , the male hormones. In humans the testes occur as a pair of oval-shaped organs. They are contained within the scrotal sac, which is located directly behind the penis and in front of the anus. In humans each testis weighs about 25 grams 0. Each is covered by a fibrous capsule called the tunica albuginea and is divided by partitions of fibrous tissue from the tunica albuginea into to wedge-shaped sections, or lobes.

Regulation of testicular function

Thank you for visiting nature. You are using a browser version with limited support for CSS. To obtain the best experience, we recommend you use a more up to date browser or turn off compatibility mode in Internet Explorer. In the meantime, to ensure continued support, we are displaying the site without styles and JavaScript. The proximity and, in some instances, communication between several structures in the testis and paratestis rete testis, epididymis, mesothelium, vestigial epithelium and paratesticular soft tissue result in a plethora of interesting tumors and tumor-like lesions that together pose a formidable diagnostic challenge both because of their morphologic overlap and rarity. The occasional spread of tumors primarily at other sites to this region adds to the potential problem encountered. This review provides an overview of the pathology of nonmesenchymal paratesticular neoplasms and pseudotumors with a focus on the approach to tubulopapillary neoplasms for which diagnostic considerations may include carcinoma of the rete testis, malignant mesothelioma, ovarian-type epithelial tumors, epididymal carcinoma and metastatic carcinomas.

Volume 11 Issue 1 Jan. Turn off MathJax Article Contents. CAO Xiao-mei. Zoological Research, , 11 1 : PDF KB. Microscopic structure of ovary and follicular development in wild adult tree shrews from Kunming,Yunnan were observed at different seasons.

The male reproductive system includes the penis, scrotum, testes, epididymis, vas deferens, prostate, and seminal vesicles. The penis and the urethra are part of the urinary and reproductive systems. The scrotum, testes testicles , epididymis, vas deferens, seminal vesicles, and prostate comprise the rest of the reproductive system. The penis consists of the root which is attached to the lower abdominal structures and pelvic bones , the visible part of the shaft, and the glans penis the cone-shaped end. The opening of the urethra the channel that transports semen and urine is located at the tip of the glans penis.

The new concept of mammalian sex maintenance establishes that particular key genes must remain active in the differentiated gonads to avoid genetic sex reprogramming, as described in adult ovaries after Foxl2 ablation. Dmrt1 plays a similar role in postnatal testes, but the mechanism of adult testis maintenance remains mostly unknown.

Окажись дома. Через пять гудков он услышал ее голос. - Здравствуйте, Это Сьюзан Флетчер. Извините, меня нет дома, но если вы оставите свое сообщение… Беккер выслушал все до конца.

Это касалось ТРАНСТЕКСТА. Это касалось и права людей хранить личные секреты, а ведь АНБ следит за всеми и каждым. Уничтожение банка данных АНБ - акт агрессии, на которую, была уверена Сьюзан, Танкадо никогда бы не пошел. Вой сирены вернул ее к действительности.

3 Comments

Avenall Г.
19.04.2021 at 00:57 - Reply

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Huara P.
21.04.2021 at 03:22 - Reply

The gametogenic development in testis is called spermatogenesis and in Requirement: Permanent slides of T.S. of testis and ovary, compound microscope​, In flowering plants, female gametophyte (embryo sac is a microscopic structure.

Pamela W.
22.04.2021 at 16:00 - Reply

leave the testis and open into epididymis located along the posterior surface of each testis. The female reproductive system consists of a pair of ovaries alongwith a pair The clitoris is a tiny finger-like structure which lies at the upper.

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